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3 Yellow Wires
Another friendly reminder to check your 3 Yellow Wires

I just bought an '84 GL1200A this week and suspected that my stator was bad due to a charging issue. When I started the process of performing a stator test last night, I found this:

(click pics to enlarge)
[Image: th_IMG469_zps6d407d45.jpg] [Image: th_IMG470_zps288ce0e6.jpg]

I never suspected my wires and connector to be in this bad of shape because the connector appeared to be in good shape on the outside. There was no indication of corrosion or melting until I slid the little boot up and took the connector apart. Blush

The good news is, after I cut the connectors off and cleaned up the wires, my stator tested great. Big Grin The wires have now been soldered together and wrapped up nicely.

So, remember, even if your connector looks good from the outside, take the connector apart and check the internal connections. Once you're that far, you may as well just get the connector out of the line and solder the wires together and wrap 'em up nice and tight with tape and heatshrink so you won't have to worry about it. Wink
New Brunswick, Canada
1984 Honda Gold Wing Aspencade GL1200A (July 2014 - present)
1984 Honda Magna V45 VF750C (2005 - present)
1973 Honda CT90 (1987 - 1989)
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#1 07-24-2014, 08:20 AM,
Mine didn't look as bad, but I decided to cut the connector out anyway. I've learned in the process that I apparently have no talent for soldering. So I was wondering: does anyone think I'd be able to use solderless connectors and the apply a little solder to the wires and connectors? Maybe even solder the connectors together? I may be able to make those solders decently. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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#2 11-03-2014, 12:18 PM,
Soldering takes practice, and the right amount of heat. Try twisting the wires together, then wrap them with solder. Take your iron and once it and the joint are hot, it should flow out and cover the joint. A drop of solder on the end of your iron will help. If you have a piece of scrap wire laying around it wouldn't hurt to practice on it.

Good luck.....
A rainy day off beats a sunny day at work any time..................
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#3 11-03-2014, 04:41 PM,
Using the connectors and soldering would be acceptable. If you look closely at the wiring harness you will see solder less connectors through out the harness.

Its the way I usually do mine, I crimp the connector then solder..... dont forget the heat shrink tubing before the crimp Smile
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

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#4 11-03-2014, 07:54 PM,
I performed this same modification when I first got my bike, a 84I with 104K miles.
The plug was melted and the connections burnt and heavily oxidized.
After the modification, charging was good for approximately 30K miles, then the regulator went followed by the stator.
I am running an external alternator now with 19K trouble free miles.

Thanks Poorboy!

-Ride On
enjoying the view from the saddle....... due mainly to the people and information found within this site
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#5 11-06-2014, 11:16 AM,
They do make a "marine" quality squeeze butt connector .... available at most marine shops.

They require quite a squeeze to get them to bite, and have a longer. waterproof outer shield .
They come in larger sizes for 12 ga wire .
http://www.stevestonmarine.com/Marine-Bo...ector.html


I decided to try them , when I replaced the %$#^@* dogbone fuse with a blade fuse in a waterproof fuse holder .
After 8 years they are still holding, and tight, and not corroded .

( I am not sure just how I feel about using them on 65+ volt stator wire connectors....
for THAT I practised soldering on scrap 12 ga wire connections, until I got it right )

Don't forget to connect your new stator wires with a Western Union Splice, and double ( or triple) shrink wrap the connection.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Union_splice


SilverDave
Reply
#6 11-09-2014, 12:12 PM,
(11-09-2014, 12:12 PM)SilverDave Wrote: They do make a "marine" quality squeeze butt connector .... available at most marine shops.

They require quite a squeeze to get them to bite, and have a longer. waterproof outer shield .
They come in larger sizes for 12 ga wire .
http://www.stevestonmarine.com/Marine-Bo...ector.html


I decided to try them , when I replaced the %$#^@* dogbone fuse with a blade fuse in a waterproof fuse holder .
After 8 years they are still holding, and tight, and not corroded .

( I am not sure just how I feel about using them on 65+ volt stator wire connectors....
for THAT I practised soldering on scrap 12 ga wire connections, until I got it right )

Don't forget to connect your new stator wires with a Western Union Splice, and double ( or triple) shrink wrap the connection.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Union_splice


SilverDave

That is a great suggestion Dave. I did much the same way. Bought mine online & then learned of Steveston Marine in Langley. 20 minutes away. oh well. Same thing happened with the trike. Cheers AngelaBig Grin
Angela(fysty-1) & Dani
Surrey, B.C., Canada
'85 Honda GL 1200 (fully dressed) I. (sold)
pres. 95 Virago 1100
"No matter how blue life may get always remember that there's a rainbow in the sky."
"Grab life by the handlbars an hang on."

Reply
#7 11-09-2014, 09:07 PM,


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