Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rear Tire Removal
unionjack Wrote:Still the nice thing about a GL1800 is you can lay her down on the right side, extend the center stand, then undo the lug nuts and lift off the rear wheel easier than a car wheel.
Now ride into town as a passenger, get a new tire mounted, and then return and install it back onto the bike again.
This only takes a few minutes to remove and reinstall the wheel using this method.

Can anyone confirm if this method will work on the GL1200i? If so, it could be a lifesaver... :YMAPPLAUSE:

BTW, why do yo have to extend the center stand? :-\

Plus, I searched for info on the forum about rear tire removal, and I've not found any links... is there a setting that will allow me to search the whole available history?

Or, if that ideas doesn't work.. why... or tell me the easiest way, other than taking it to a service center. Mine here wants me to buy the tires from them; but, I'd just as likely do the whole thing myself if I could.
Reply
#1 08-10-2011, 11:04 AM,
Now why on earth would you look under wheels for wheel removal :- :- :- :d :d

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://gl1200goldwings.com/viewtopic.php?f=59&t=7804">http://gl1200goldwings.com/viewtopic.php?f=59&t=7804</a><!-- m -->


"Can anyone confirm if this method will work on the GL1200i? If so, it could be a lifesaver... :YMAPPLAUSE: " I wish
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

Reply
#2 08-10-2011, 11:55 AM,
The 1200 wheel cannot be removed like the 1800. If you have a lift, the wheel may be removed without taking the rear fender extension off. If not, I would advise that you just get a shop to do it.
I have an electric hoist in the ceiling of my workshop and lift the bike up by removing the seat and hooking the hoist to the center crossmember just behind the tank. I rest the bike on the center stand with an 8" piece of lumber under it for stability, leaving tension on the hoist cable. I do all repair work on the bike that way. No chance of letting it fall over.
Bob
Reply
#3 08-10-2011, 01:58 PM,
I have a motorcycle lift which allowed me enough height to remove the rear wheel. I just removed the saddlebags (not the guards) and disconnected the shocks to allow lowering the wheel.
While the wheel was off, servicing the gears and spider were a no-brainer. Go slow and use caution, and you can remove the rear wheel yourself.
I also removed and installed front and rear tires. Again, go slow, use caution and this too can be accomplished.
What you can get out of it are the bragging rights of doing it yourself, the opportunity of becoming more intimate with your bike, and pocketing the money it would have cost to have a shop do the work.
Of course, doing your own work is also a great aphrodisiac too.

Read the suggestions given here at the forum, read the manual (tricky supplied, library, on-line copies or elsewhere).
Of course, FAP (Forum Approved Procedures) are known to work better than the manuals, but the manuals are a good starting point.

BTW, if you feel you might be getting in over your head, by all means, find someone with more experience to do the job. In fact, maybe they will allow you to watch, help, or even teach you to do this so you will know for next time.

Good Luck
enjoying the view from the saddle....... due mainly to the people and information found within this site
Reply
#4 08-10-2011, 02:47 PM,
This method 'can' be used on any of the goldwings but it is noway as easy on any of the other bikes as it is on the single sided swingarmed GL1800.

With all of our bikes it also involves unbolting the shocks, brake caliper mount, and removing the spindle from through the wheel and differential.

In an emergency (on the side of the road) you could use this method on the double sided swingarm bikes, but it would be ugly, even better is if you put her onto the center stand on a sidewalk next to the curb and then pivot the bike around until the rear wheel is out over the curb, this gives you much more clearance to drop the wheel out from under the GL1000-GL1500's.
'RIDE TO BE SEEN' :d

Most common quote from a cager after killing a motorcyclist.

"I never saw him" instead of "I never looked for him".
Reply
#5 08-10-2011, 03:09 PM,
By the way, the reason you extend the center stand once the bike is on the guards is to raise the rear wheel 1" off of the ground, without it the bike would 'settle' as the lug nuts are removed.making it impossible to remove the wheel without damaging the bags, and impossible to mount the new wheel back into place.
'RIDE TO BE SEEN' :d

Most common quote from a cager after killing a motorcyclist.

"I never saw him" instead of "I never looked for him".
Reply
#6 08-10-2011, 03:15 PM,
I had quite lengthy and good discussion about this just today with another member.

The problem is with the rear tire FLAT AS A PANCAKE on the side of the road, you can't hold the bike up, and lift the rear end enough BY YOURSELF to get the bike on the center stand or even the kick stand. We talked about using either a small bottle jack, or possible a small scissors jack. Still one has the issue of having to steady the bike while trying to position and work the jack.

Seems that the best case scenario for a flat on the side of the road would be to have a jack that would slide under the bike and do the lifting, with a helper (likely a passerby or good samaratin) to help steady the bike until it is lifted into position to remove the wheel. Or, better yet, enroll in rescue plus or another emergency towing service and have the bike towed or trailered.

I have removed my rear wheel in the garage many times, with the tire inflated and the bike on the center stand. It is a job under the best of conditions. I can't imagine wrestling with that on the side of the road, in the hot sun, with traffic whizzing by. It probably has been done, but it can't be easy.

If anybody has a different take on this, please speak up!!

BTW ... stopngo tire plugger can seal most tread punctures relatively easily, on the side of the road, without removing the wheel. I now carry one and highly recommend it.
A rainy day off beats a sunny day at work any time..................
Reply
#7 08-10-2011, 06:13 PM,
In addition to a Harbor Freight hydraulic lift (with the extra sides added on), I invested $55 in a hefty flat scissor-type "dirt bike" jack(1,100 lb capacity) from Amazon.com.

[Image: 51o-paxgc7L._SS400_.jpg]

When a suitable 2-inch piece of wood is placed between the very stable (has outriggers) jack's flat upper platform and cross-ways under the bike's retracted center stand (the whole arrangement on the hydraulic lift) then the rear wheel can be elevated up off the lift between 3-3/4"(95mm) and 15-3/4"(400mm).

Of course, the front of the bike must be strapped down (and I also place floor jacks under the engine guards to prevent the bike from pitching). Either for dismounting the rear wheel or other up-in-the-air maintenance, the relatively low cost "dirt bike" jack is very handy to have around.
[Image: Akriti2450x338.jpg]

" ... If you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." ~ George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Reply
#8 08-10-2011, 08:27 PM,
I am in the process of installing new tires. I do all my own work. I picked up some spare rims on ebay for a hundred bucks. (make shure the splines on the rear drive are right for your bike. I am working on a good jack set up that is safe easy to use and transportable. ie trailor. Once again I will try and post photos when I get it sorted out.
Patriot Guard Rider
Vintage MX ( Love my old CZ mx bikes and my 73 Jawa 402 ISDT)
Reply
#9 03-24-2012, 06:02 PM,
jawajohn Wrote:I am in the process of installing new tires. I do all my own work. I picked up some spare rims on ebay for a hundred bucks. (make shure the splines on the rear drive are right for your bike. I am working on a good jack set up that is safe easy to use and transportable. ie trailor. Once again I will try and post photos when I get it sorted out.

Any photos yet? I am pretty interested to check in on this project. I have been pretty interested to see how people are incorporating recent trends in vehicle technology to the work they are doing at home or independent from any kind of certified vendor. I have my fingers crossed that you will be back on this thread to post some pics and let these curious eyes take a look.
It's True - Three Wives During the Same Time as One Bike - It's True
Reply
#10 05-16-2012, 10:36 AM,
As a kid I used to rest my bicycle on its handlebars (towel underneath) and the seat when I needed to service tires, chains or hub bearing adjustments.

Do you think this method would work on a GL1200?

just kidding - NOBODY do this!!!! :-J

-Ride On B-(
enjoying the view from the saddle....... due mainly to the people and information found within this site
Reply
#11 05-24-2012, 10:35 AM,


Possibly Related Threads…
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  Rear wheel removal seagullplayer 11 2,056 06-03-2018, 11:48 AM
Last Post: Milesofsmiles
  rear wheel removal 1200 Aspencade Milesofsmiles 2 73 06-03-2018, 09:01 AM
Last Post: SIR tricky
  Rear tire question for my GL1200I BADMOD97 14 2,079 11-18-2014, 02:02 PM
Last Post: BADMOD97
  Rear wheel looks off center after tire change Flounder 4 748 12-13-2013, 11:01 PM
Last Post: Flounder
  Rear tire removal, easier third or fourth time around Roleketu 13 1,439 08-15-2013, 06:54 AM
Last Post: bs175dths
  Rear tire rubbing on swingarm? brobbed 7 599 05-21-2012, 03:29 PM
Last Post: ghostrider52005
  Any tips on rear tire removal? PanMan75 8 521 04-01-2012, 07:34 AM
Last Post: PanMan75
  Maxis Rear tire. ghostrider52005 4 484 10-07-2011, 10:44 PM
Last Post: ghostrider52005
  Rear tire on front? PanMan75 12 961 08-17-2011, 04:11 AM
Last Post: PanMan75
  Front tire removal PanMan75 4 514 07-26-2011, 05:12 PM
Last Post: PanMan75

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | GL1200 GOLDWINGS | Return to Top | | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication
google-site-verification: googled4b4fe31e07b65d8.html