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CHANGING FUEL FILTER: Question of type + Safety Warning
This post is NOT strictly speaking a "fuel injection" topic but is a fuel topic covering both carb and also fuel injection bikes.Two things are for sure: 1) A clogged filter will slow the flow of fuel and completely affect a bike's performance; and 2) A defective, leaky filter allows debris and fuel "sludge" to get through, clogging orifices in a carburetor or injectors leading to having to clean and rebuild each of them.

I'll begin with The Question:

Are there any opinions out there on the pros and cons of a cool glass fuel filter versus the OEM? :-\

[attachment=0]

The price is a pretty modest $6.75 considering how much fancy material (chrome fittings etc.) go into it.

What I like about the glass filter is that it is completely see through. The glass is fairly thick so unless the filter gets a direct hard hit it should be O.K.

My old filter looks kinda crappy, and who knows when it was last changed? On the other hand, very recently the new EMGO fuel filter was shown HERE at our GL1200 GoldWings site to be a mess !

[Image: file.php?id=2399&mode=view]

My big Question 1 is: Has anyone had experience with the glass filter and does it do a good job ?.

PART II: Self-preservation:

[Image: Burned_Goldwing.jpg]

This is the result of a GL1000 owner who had a loose fuel line fastener remaining after working on his fuel system - don't let this happen to you! [courtesy of GoldWingDocs.com]/

Our "cousins" at goldwingdocs.com posted a useful series of photos on how to change a fuel filter along with LOTS of warnings about the hazards of working on the fuel moving system. However, the configuration in the Wing shown at the GoldWingdocs.com site is different from my 1985 GL1200 Interstate (my bike seems to have nearly zero clearance to work on it because of lines crossing closely over the mounted filter when it's in place.

GoldWingDocs.com also has a detailed, illustrated warning about EMGO filter failures:problems caused by faulty filters
[Image: Emgo_fuel_filter_5.jpg]
and after discussing the http://[/url], and then post a section w...es:[/size] In the end, the GoldWingdocs.com site mentiones the glass filter as a desirable alternative -- but so far no one at GL1200GoldWings.com has "seconded" the motion.

'Anybody still out there??? #-O :-SS


Attached Files
.tiff   Glass filter.tiff (Size: 359.88 KB / Downloads: 509)
.jpg   Glass filter.jpg (Size: 62.22 KB / Downloads: 510)
[Image: Akriti2450x338.jpg]

" ... If you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." ~ George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
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#1 07-02-2011, 09:21 PM,
Arghhh!!!

After replacing the fuel lines (stainless steel hose + stainless steel hose clamps) and filter, I reassembled the line EXCEPT being able to reattach the filter mount to the fuel tank via the 5 mm hex nut. There are TWO hydraulic lines (rear brake + clutch) crossing in front of where the filter mount bolt faces the right side.

Many times, I placed the nut inside the 5 mm hex socket and then nearly blindly try to get the nut onto the bolt. No luck! To get around the hydraulic lines which block straight access to the bolt, I have to angle the socket. Of course, half the time the nut falls out of the socket before I can get it near the bolt ... and then good luck trying to find where it dropped.

The short question is: what's the trick for getting the nut to stay inside the socket long enough to get it onto the bolt? I tried jamming bit of paper in there to get the nut to stay. That doesn't work.

I could let the filter just hang there ... BUT first of all it has a mainly glass chamber. If it is not held down by its mounting, I worry that vibrations may knock the filter against a hard surface and then it wold be fuel ALL OVER the place.

Any suggestions on how to get that pesky nut back onto the mounting bolt ????
[Image: Akriti2450x338.jpg]

" ... If you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." ~ George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Reply
#2 07-11-2011, 11:26 PM,
Maybe a bit of Vaseline will hold it in lone enough. I have a magnetic 1/4 inch drive socket set that works great.
Ride safe have fun and enjoy. Lane
1985 Aspencade
2002 Vulcan
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#3 07-12-2011, 03:48 AM,
Granpah, I have read somewhere that others have had a similar problem with glass filters when trying to mount them back on. I don't remember where I read it but the only solution had seemed to be using zip ties to prevent any unwanted movement and such.
Mike                  
'84 Aspencade                                      
*Poorboy Conversion                              
* Bed-liner Black                                    

North Jersey Motorcycle Group
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#4 07-12-2011, 03:49 AM,
I installed an OEM Honda filter ... (in the "time before the bike lift...") if I remember - sticking the fiddly little machine screw to the socket with grease or something and judicious use of swears got it done...


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#5 07-12-2011, 04:43 AM,
Try electrical tape inside the socket to hold the nut where you want it.

Be careful, and make sure your oil fill cap is on. I once dropped that stupid fuel filter nut right into the crack case because I was changing the oil at the same time and it bounced right off the engine block then right down that hole all net! LOL!...I was able to retrieve it with a magnet but just a word of caution.
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#6 07-12-2011, 05:21 AM,
bluewing Wrote:Maybe a bit of Vaseline will hold it in lone enough. I have a magnetic 1/4 inch drive socket set that works great.

I like the magnetic socket approach. Some time ago, I bought one such socket for the spark plugs ... which works great! I am so frustrated with bolting onto the gas tank that lousy filter mounting bracket that I'll try anything. Today, I'm going to try find a set of magnetic sockets at my local auto supply store. I've had it with this nut! Grrrr!

Clearly, Mother Honda designed the fuel filter mounting bracket (which is very specific) not wishing any part of the fuel delivery line to be able to work itself loose. After all, a lot of fuel suddenly falling onto the nearby red hot exhaust manifold below could produce catastrophic results! :-SS
[Image: Akriti2450x338.jpg]

" ... If you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." ~ George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Reply
#7 07-12-2011, 07:16 AM,
KnoxSwift Wrote:I once dropped that stupid fuel filter nut right into the crank case because I was changing the oil at the same time and it bounced right off the engine block then right down that hole all net!

Luckily, I was only changing the fuel filter. But dropping the stupid fuel filter nut right into the crank case is going to be my newest nightmare. I can't imagine how you got it out of there with a magnet? With my luck, I would have had to open the crank case to get the nut out Confusedhock: B-(

Even now, with everything closed up on the engine, the last time the nut fell I couldn't find out where it went. There are too many nooks and crannies above the engine where a 5 mm nut can be hiding!.
[Image: Akriti2450x338.jpg]

" ... If you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." ~ George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Reply
#8 07-12-2011, 07:25 AM,
Yes, I epoxied a magnet from a dead harddrive to a string. I slipped the string down into the engine and "BINK" captured the nut then pulled it out.

Now I can say all this calmly but at the time there was sure a lot of cursing going on...But by the way the area you pour the oil in is fairly isolated from the rest of the engine. There are two bearings on either side of the output shaft that will keep the nut in that area. Then the "slit" for lack of better term, is so small it will keep the nut from slipping down into the clutch areas. BUT I'm sure there is something small enough to fall through that so take it from me be careful. My stupidity will hopeful help others out there...LOL!
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#9 07-12-2011, 08:46 AM,
I'm glad you posted this. I now will go and take a good look at my fuel lines and filter. I wonder if there is room to re-route the fuel lines so that the filter could be placed in an area where it could be reached easier. I'll take a look when I go outside again. Confusedhock:

These posts make me think. (sort of) :- :-
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#10 07-12-2011, 08:52 AM,
PanMan75 Wrote:Granpah, I have read somewhere that others have had a similar problem with glass filters when trying to mount them back on. I don't remember where I read it but the only solution had seemed to be using zip ties to prevent any unwanted movement and such.

As a matter of fact, PanMan75 the only problem I had was that the glass cylinder diameter is slightly less than the OEM filter ... for which the mounting bracket was designed. But THAT is not a problem. One or two turns of electrical tape are enough to take up the slack between the clamp part of the bracket and the filter. Also, I feel a lot better having soft tape between the glass cylinder and metal clamp of the bracket. Other than that, ONLY problem is to get that @*&^%#$%@ 5 mm nut back onto its bolt which attaches the filter bracket to the gas tank so it isn't free to get knocked around. The way I figure, one hard smack to the glass filter would be enough to cause big trouble. So far, the glass filter is supposed to be more effective than the EMGO (which is poorly made) or even an OEM.

Although when the hefty fuel lines are clamped to the gas tank spigot at one end and the inlet for the fuel pump at the other, the fuel line assembly seems quite rigid. Still, the bike's vibrations plus a few big road bumps could conceivably slam a filter NOT anchored down into something hard ... and break open at the filter. That's a scary thought. Confusedhock: So I'll keep monkeying around trying to attach the filter the way it's supposed to be bolted down inside the mounting bracket to the gas tank. :YMSIGH:
[Image: Akriti2450x338.jpg]

" ... If you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." ~ George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Reply
#11 07-12-2011, 10:07 AM,
sundance Wrote:I'm glad you posted this. I now will go and take a good look at my fuel lines and filter. I wonder if there is room to re-route the fuel lines so that the filter could be placed in an area where it could be reached easier. I'll take a look when I go outside again. Confusedhock:

These posts make me think. (sort of) :- :-

That would be great Bill if you can think of a better way to mount the filter. In the original configuration, the filter is held by a clamp inside a bracket located smack in the middle of the forward part of the gas tank. That position is behind the pretty rigid brake and clutch hydraulic lines on the right side, and (easily removable) breather tube plus "immovable" carb rods and linkages on the left.

Getting the old filter out is EASY. After snaking a 5 mm socket onto the nut (facing the right side) around the hydraulic lines with a little gentle force, the nut can be removed. Then removing the old fuel lines from the gas tank spigot and fuel pump is also easy. Changing the old lines for new ones is also easy. Everything is easy except getting the 5 mm nut back on the bracket bolt.

I suppose longer fuel lines can be cut for relocating the filter ... but where exactly would you anchor it? Since the forward part of the fuel tank is midway between the spigot and the fuel pump, the Honda engineers figured that's the best place to anchor a filter. It's supposed to get replaced every 24,000 miles ... a fairly long time between changes on the maintenance timetable. But there's gotta' be a better way!
[Image: Akriti2450x338.jpg]

" ... If you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." ~ George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Reply
#12 07-12-2011, 10:30 AM,
Granpah, I used a very similar filter, glass body and replaceable filter element, used the stock mounting bracket, instead of tape i used the rubber cover from an insulated electrical conduit strap. It was a perfect fit and the clamp holds it securely with out any movement. As for the nut, if you very careful about it the hard line in the way can be gently bent out of the way. anyone that has ever made their own replacement brake lines for a car can tell you it is easy to do just be very gentle. Also if you use a good magnet and touch it to the socket you are using it should give a slight magnetic charge, and should be enough to get it in there and in place.


Mark
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#13 07-12-2011, 07:54 PM,
A good replacement for the filter:

Fuel Filter Napa 3011

And doesn't cost a lot either
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

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#14 07-12-2011, 08:55 PM,
RAN OUT OF PATIENCE !

So after losing the original 5 mm flanged nut (fell somewhere on the bile's engine or rolled to some dark corner of my garage), I grabbed a 6 mm stainless steel nut which just about fit the mounting bracket bolt... but not snugly. Then added a couple of drops of epoxy to the nut/bolt while still syrupy. I'll worry about undoing the epoxy 24,000 miles from now. Then I made a final check of ALL the fuel line connections to make sure they were tightly held on by the stainless steel hose clamps.

Here's the payoff: Following Vic's good advice, I turned the engine over (with the kill switch on) to lubricate the engine before firing it up, and also letting the fuel have a chances to percolate through the system to the fuel pump. Then I hit the starter button again (kill switch off) and stone cold the engine fired up within one rotation. It never did that, sometimes even warm. The dramatic improvement in performance I attribute to efficient fuel flow though a new clean filter. (I dissected the old filter and it looked like someone had dropped glue into it!).

So for those who rebuild their carbs, don't forget to change your fuel filter before sync and tuning up the motor. In fact, before you put the carbs back on, it shouldn't take more than 5 minutes to change the filter + fuel lines. My problems were from having to change the filter while the carbs were on -- no space or getting in there. It is a big pain in the butt to get the filter bracket back to where it was originally mounted, but a new fuel filter can make a significant/noticeable difference in engine performance!
:YMHUG: :YMHUG: :YMHUG: :YMHUG:
[Image: Akriti2450x338.jpg]

" ... If you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." ~ George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950)
Reply
#15 07-14-2011, 06:16 PM,


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