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Mounting Your Own Tires....
It seems that MANY owners are willing to pull off the tires to bring them to the shops for mounting...looking at the directions in the manuals it seems that the rest of the operation is the same as bicycle tire that all of us have changed a thousand times as kids.

Whats the difference????????
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#1 06-07-2007, 06:45 PM,
The strength of the bead is greater by far and the aluminum rim can be damaged easily if you're not careful, but, if you're brave and daring and muscular get yourself a metal garbage can and give it a try. Place some cloths around the top of the can to protect the rim, the can is to protect the rotors, next use a C clamp to break the bead then use teflon coated spoons to reach in and pull the bead over the rim, keep inching it out as you push the opposite side of the tire down into the center of the rim until the entire bead is out, repeat for the next bead, clean the rim and use bead sealer if rough, then instal the new tire using liquid soap on the bead, using spoons to pry it on while keeping bead in center of rim, repeat for next bead. Now the hard part; you may need a band around the tire to compress the tire so that the beads can contact both sides of the rim at the same time while you're putting air in so that the air blows the tire up and seal the tire to the rim. This is not always easy even at the shop, but you might get lucky at home.
Ed (Vic) Belanger - 1954-2015
Founder of gl1200goldwings.com

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#2 06-07-2007, 07:25 PM,
hhhhmmmmmm........................................................nevermind.
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#3 06-07-2007, 08:03 PM,
With a couple cold beers and a good buddy it might be a fun thing to do on a rainy Saturday night.
Ed (Vic) Belanger - 1954-2015
Founder of gl1200goldwings.com

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#4 06-07-2007, 08:31 PM,
Is there any issue with balancing the tire once it is mounted? Is the motorcycle tire like a car tire in so much as balancing goes?
Remember, No matter where you go...There you are!

Here is where I have ridden my 1984 GL1200I
I completed the lower 48 states in August 2009, riding the whole way with my Dad

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#5 06-08-2007, 05:50 AM,
I prefer the high speed balancincing method myself (like a car) since I can sometimes reach high speeds with my bike but you can static balance the tire/wheel assembly at home on the axle but it won't take into account side to side imbalance conditions but it's better than no balance at all.
Ed (Vic) Belanger - 1954-2015
Founder of gl1200goldwings.com

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#6 06-08-2007, 06:44 AM,
I checked with Zdeno Cycle in Kitchener today for an Elite III front tire. They have it in stock, $165.00 plus $35.00 to install and balance.

All I have to do is ride to them. Not worth the time or trouble to DIY.

Howard (not lazy; at times smart) :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
Howard & Sharon Sims-GWRRA#259911
EX 1986 Aspencade
EX 2002 GL-1800

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#7 06-08-2007, 02:05 PM,
That sure seems like a super deal on that tire Howard.
Ed (Vic) Belanger - 1954-2015
Founder of gl1200goldwings.com

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#8 06-08-2007, 04:00 PM,
Okay, I'm an old farmer at heart. Done alot of tire work from my teenage days at the only gas station in town, to days on the farm with big John Deere tractors. Has anyone else used the old method of seating a stubborn tubeless tire. A short shot of ether? I can already see the raised eyebrows!!!
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#9 06-08-2007, 06:19 PM,
Kabooooomm!!!!!!!!!!

Could be Fun though.................

:lol:
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#10 06-10-2007, 10:45 AM,
I worked for a major Canadian tire dealer for far too many years.

Have seen done and done things that make me cringe today. :oops:

Howard (older, hopefully smarter) :!:
Howard & Sharon Sims-GWRRA#259911
EX 1986 Aspencade
EX 2002 GL-1800

[Image: VisitedProvincesMap-copy.jpg][Image: VisitedStatesMap.jpg]
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#11 06-10-2007, 07:48 PM,
When I was a teen I worked at Canadian Tire for several years so I know full well what you mean Howard. HEEE HAAWW
Ed (Vic) Belanger - 1954-2015
Founder of gl1200goldwings.com

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#12 06-10-2007, 08:05 PM,
If a guy did manage to get a new tire on the rim, could one of those ratcheting tie downs be used, wrapped around the outside of the tire, to help get the bead sealed? Or wouldn't there be enough pressure on the tire to do the job?

I worked at a car dealership many years ago.......I remember a thing that wrapped around the tire and inflated with air to squeeze the tire against the rim. Or was that in a dream? 2 lifetimes ago, to be sure Sad
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#13 06-11-2007, 09:52 PM,
85GL1200I Wrote:Kabooooomm!!!!!!!!!!

Could be Fun though.................

:lol:

It's more like a whoof! A little too much and the tire & rim jump up about a foot off the ground. You do what you have to do on the farm!!
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#14 06-12-2007, 04:42 AM,
85GL1200I Wrote:If a guy did manage to get a new tire on the rim, could one of those ratcheting tie downs be used, wrapped around the outside of the tire, to help get the bead sealed? Or wouldn't there be enough pressure on the tire to do the job?

I worked at a car dealership many years ago.......I remember a thing that wrapped around the tire and inflated with air to squeeze the tire against the rim. Or was that in a dream? 2 lifetimes ago, to be sure Sad

************************************************************

That's exactly what I used last time I changed a tire by hand, a ratcheting tie down, it worked like a charm.
Ed (Vic) Belanger - 1954-2015
Founder of gl1200goldwings.com

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#15 06-12-2007, 05:52 AM,


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