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trying to understand how rewire would solve melting issue
I have purchased a mistreated 84 gl1200i and am having issues with the solenoid wiring melting. Purchased a new solenoid unit off web and works fire when connected. start it up and heat races to melting stage (69 degrees to 130 degrees) never popping the fuse but actually melting the fuse and burning up the red wire connection over time. I read Solenoid modification GL1200
I understand how he is rewiring but I do not understand how this fixes the overheating going on. won't it just happen again? Is it just a cheap connector causing the issue?
I am not a mechanical / electrical person but trying to figure out how to permanently fix the issue.
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#1 10-24-2016, 09:49 AM,
The overheating that I experienced was caused by loose fuse connection.
After making the modification yes your right it can happen again if the fuse becomes loose again as it did several years later.

Those fuses must be tight.

I would check for a short in the wiring if your certain that the fuses are tight.

The red wire goes to the IGN switch.
The R/W wire goes to the regulator / rectifier

I am assuming you have a schematic
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

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#2 10-24-2016, 06:41 PM,
No I do not have a schematic yet as it has been ordered but not yet delivered. I am probably going to open a can of worms with a new question on this but the wiring on this bike was just twisted together and electrical taped together. The bike has been through elemental hell and is dirty, dusty, and in poor condition. I want to clean all the electrical connection including the standard physical connectors but have been reading that Dielectric Grease is not what one should use. I figure to start canned air, then clean wiring and connectors by hand, but what could I put on the connection to insure good connectivity. Afterward the loose wires I wire heat wrap seal them.
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#3 10-26-2016, 06:27 AM,
for the most part the solenoid mod is designed to not only replace the "dogbone" but also hardwire that solenoid connector out of the circuit,if that has been already done and the fuse appears to be melting,only thing it could be is that the fuse is carrying more than 80% of its amp rating

to me sounds like your regulator connector probably going bad too,my suggestion would be to hardwire that connector "out"
1987 Aspencade 129K
1986 SEI 93K
2014 Tri-Glide HD 17K

Hancock,MD
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#4 10-26-2016, 06:51 AM,
(10-26-2016, 06:27 AM)popogrunge Wrote: No I do not have a schematic yet as it has been ordered but not yet delivered. I am probably going to open a can of worms with a new question on this but the wiring on this bike was just twisted together and electrical taped together. The bike has been through elemental hell and is dirty, dusty, and in poor condition. I want to clean all the electrical connection including the standard physical connectors but have been reading that Dielectric Grease is not what one should use. I figure to start canned air, then clean wiring and connectors by hand, but what could I put on the connection to insure good connectivity. Afterward the loose wires I wire heat wrap seal them.

PM me your email address and I shall send you a PDF of the schematic,

Solder connections and heat shrink any of your connections.

Dielectric grease is fine for actual connectors
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

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#5 10-26-2016, 04:05 PM,
Clean, tight connectors are key to keeping the electron happy. When there is corrosion, there is resistance, and resistance creates heat.
Resistance can also be created when too small of a gauge of wire is used for too much current.
Of course, as mentioned, if the gauge is correct, but there is a short, causing more current to move through the wire, again, heat and a melt down.

A project which has been mistreated can turn into a career.

As you have done, make the obvious repairs. If repaired properly, and it fails again, you will have to trace the wire and see if there is a short somewhere.

Electrons are like water molecules, they will take the path of least resistance. The electrons goal is to go to ground. It is our job to harness those electrons and guide them to the location we want, to do the work we want them to do.
Electrons can be temperamental - which is why electricians go to school and get paid what they get paid.
Good Luck.

-Ride On
enjoying the view from the saddle....... due mainly to the people and information found within this site
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#6 02-09-2017, 07:54 AM,
Awesome thank you I have removed all the cowling and all extra "shinies" from the bike and have it down to bare connections and usage. we are deep cleaning everything wires, connectors, etc etc you have confirmed my thoughts that clean simple first then go from there.




(02-09-2017, 07:54 AM)bs175dths Wrote: Clean, tight connectors are key to keeping the electron happy. When there is corrosion, there is resistance, and resistance creates heat.
Resistance can also be created when too small of a gauge of wire is used for too much current.
Of course, as mentioned, if the gauge is correct, but there is a short, causing more current to move through the wire, again, heat and a melt down.

A project which has been mistreated can turn into a career.

As you have done, make the obvious repairs. If repaired properly, and it fails again, you will have to trace the wire and see if there is a short somewhere.

Electrons are like water molecules, they will take the path of least resistance. The electrons goal is to go to ground. It is our job to harness those electrons and guide them to the location we want, to do the work we want them to do.
Electrons can be temperamental - which is why electricians go to school and get paid what they get paid.
Good Luck.

-Ride On
Reply
#7 02-10-2017, 06:01 AM,
I want to say thanks for all the suggestions as they have helped. I cleaned all the connections and that helped but not completely so I did a bypass on the fuse on the aftermarket solenoid connection adding an inline fuse and it worked dropping the heat all the way down to double digit numbers.
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#8 03-08-2017, 08:51 AM,


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