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Engine noise coupled to speakers
I am posting this thread in the audio section because it manifests itself in speaker noise.

Early this riding season, sometimes I would get some noise coupled into the audio system that could be heard over the speakers...sounds like white noise that mimics engine rpm. It is electrical in nature because when there is a draw on the battery (brakes on, turn signal), the noise decreases. With the turn signal on, the noise pulsed in time with the flash.

This issue seemed to be more likely to happen when it was cold outside. However, I don't recall the noise stopping when the engine got warm. Seems like once it starts, it doesn't stop until the bike gets re-started...maybe.

Anyways, pretty sure it is not the head unit since I turned it off and would still get the noise. Once the weather got warm the issue seems to have stopped, but it popped up again last week and then went away.

The sound system is stock except for replacement speakers.

Possible causes:
1. Bad ground
2. Alternator getting ready to fail - I have replaced the yellow wire connector but still have the original alternator.

Thanks!

- Pete
Reply
#1 09-01-2015, 07:38 PM,
If you connect a voltmeter while the bike is running you will find that the voltage is over 14.2 when the noise starts, hence the decrease in noise when the stop lights are activated.

The regulator is not reading the correct voltage at the battery, a common problem.

If you make the changes according to the diagram, you should see the noise disappear.

I added the file in PDF in case you cant open a DOC file


Attached Files
.   There are a lot of threads about voltmeters that read incorrectly or batteries that are being overcharged by the regulat (Size: 54 KB / Downloads: 14)
.   There are a lot of threads about voltmeters that read incorrectly or batteries that are being overcharged by the regulat (Size: 146.43 KB / Downloads: 11)
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

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#2 09-02-2015, 07:35 AM,
SIR Tricky -

Thanks for the reply. I completely understand the concept you are trying to explain. And I see the three yellow wires on the alternator output. What are the red and green wires in your diagram? More specifically, should the wires be red and green on the actual motorcycle? Thanks for your help.

- Pete
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#3 09-03-2015, 05:30 AM,
Your looking at the regulator wiring. Everything stays the same (yellow,Red & green) It is the black wire that needs to see the voltage directly from the battery.
Presently that wire is reading the voltage after traveling through Ign switch, etc and there is a possible loss, using the diagram allows the regulator to correctly read the state of the battery.

You may find that after you start your bike, the noise in the headset is not there (because using the battery during the start procedure) the voltage is actually below 14.2 when the system is charging and the regulator doesn't see the true reading it starts to put out the maximum.. about 15v hence the noise in the headset.

When the brake is applied the voltage drops below 14.2 the noise disappears.
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

Reply
#4 09-03-2015, 10:09 AM,
Electro Magnetic Field or Electro Magnetic Interference if fun stuff!

Just for grins, if you have the time, and a compass......

With the motorcycle off, move the compass around the bike and note the deflection of the compass needle.
around the battery, the stator, the coils, around the electronics....

With the engine on, move the compass to those same spots and see what the needle does!
With the engine RPM running as if the bike were moving down the road, move the compass to those same spots and see what the needle does!

Another thing is cross-talk...
sound quality will deteriorate if the wires to the speakers are too close to a wire carrying a power source. The EMF from the power wire can cross through the audio wires and deterioration can occur. Simply moving the audio wires out of the range of the EMF can reduce or eliminate audio deterioration.
enjoying the view from the saddle....... due mainly to the people and information found within this site
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#5 09-04-2015, 08:30 AM,
(09-02-2015, 07:35 AM)SIR tricky Wrote: If you connect a voltmeter while the bike is running you will find that the voltage is over 14.2 when the noise starts, hence the decrease in noise when the stop lights are activated.

The regulator is not reading the correct voltage at the battery, a common problem.

If you make the changes according to the diagram, you should see the noise disappear.

I added the file in PDF in case you cant open a DOC file

I have have the same problem. Your answer makes perfect sense. Might explain why my regulator can get so hot that I worry about my tank shelter being deformed from so Much heat, you can hardly keep your hand on it. I found a temporary solution by installing additional driving lamps & turning them on when noise starts. I see that is only a temporary fix as I did not realize that my harness was not sensing the true battery voltage. Thanks Evan
Reply
#6 11-15-2015, 06:23 PM,


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