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HELP! SNAPPED FRONT AXLE RETAINING STUD!!
HELP!!!!!!

Does anyone know if the front fork studs that connect the front axel holder to the fork are replaceable, and if so, 1) where to get them, what they are made of and what size the are, and 2) a technique for replacing them, preferably without removing the forks!

I am SO pissed at myself. I looked at the Frame Torque Specs in the front of the Clymer manual and thought I was being so methodical in replacing the front wheel. Damn if I didn't look too quickly and set the torque wrench for the 43 ft-lbs for the "Front Axle Nut" instead of the 18 ft-lbs for the "Front Axle Holder Nut" !!! Before the first one snapped, I had been tightening each one in sequence, so I probably deformed the other three too much to safely rely on them anymore. With the intact ones, I can probably get enough bite for a double-nut removal if they aren't heat-shrunk interference fit parts. The one that snapped will be a bitch to remove....

Everyone should do themselves a favor and circle the 18 ft-lb number for the "Front Axle Holder Nut" so you don't repeat my idiotic mistake!!

Anyone have any experience with this?? AngryAngryAngry

(04-19-2015, 05:11 PM)wallbrad Wrote: Before the first one snapped, I had been tightening each one in sequence, so I probably deformed the other three too much to safely rely on them anymore.

Interesting what happens when you don't double check the manual before doing stuff like this! I forgot that the front end of the axle holder was supposed to be in contact with the fork and tightened first to the specified torque before tightening the rear nuts!!! Good thing it broke or I could have overloaded the studs while riding due to my incorrect torque sequence!!! Funny how God keeps me from my own fatal mistakes by throwing a trivial one in front of me to keep me from the wrong path!

I also looked around some other wing forums and did a better search around here on different words. Looks like the studs are replaceable and should be able to be replaced while the forks are on the bike. Now to locate the correct parts in someone's warehouse.... Anyone know for certain the length and thread size for an 85 GL1200i ? Some of the on-line catalogs won't show the part--worried that it is no longer made?

-Brad
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#1 04-19-2015, 05:11 PM,
Should be able to order from a Honda dealer
Item 072 BOLT, STUD (10X52) part # 90102-463-003


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The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

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#2 04-19-2015, 08:00 PM,
If it broke off flush, it's going to be tough. I broke some exhaust manifold bolts of a Ford 460 in a van. I had to use a Dremel tool to carefully make a depresion in the exact center of the broken bolt. The I drilled it being careful to stay square with the surface. I slowly increased the drill size until I could get a EZout in the broken piece. But it finally worked.

It only took me 3 weeks to fix the leaky exhaust maniflolds.
Dave R
Patriot Guard Rider
Previous bikes[/size]
CT 90--- 1960 125 Benly (Honda)--- Insane minibike with 125 Honda motor--- 1982 CB 650
current bikes
1987 CN 250 Helix--- 1985 GL1200 LTD
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#3 04-19-2015, 09:12 PM,
Thanks, SirTricky. I had also found that part number on-line, but it appears that the stud is now a discontinued part. I'm going to have to improvise. It's an M10 thread, and the 52 (in the 10X52) callout is it's length. If push comes to shove, I should be able to find a bolt that is either 60mm long which can be shortened, or, probably better, use a 10X50 bolt (or stud) that is slightly shorter. In either case, I'll stick with stainless so as not to cause too much dissimilar metals problems with the aluminum fork casting. The only problem with shorter is that I need to get the same length of engagement inside the fork as the current stud provides so as not to overstress the aluminum fork. I need to think about the torque though, as one has to be careful in tightening a bolt head vs tightening a nut (which is always preferable). 18 ft-lbs isn't very much torque, so I should be safe using the same amount. In any case, I'll apply some torque-seal paint so that I can have a visual check for any loosening in case 18 ft-lbs isn't enough,

Looks like any of us that break one of these studs will be in the same boat!
-Brad
Reply
#4 04-21-2015, 12:39 PM,
(04-21-2015, 12:39 PM)wallbrad Wrote: Thanks, SirTricky. I had also found that part number on-line, but it appears that the stud is now a discontinued part. I'm going to have to improvise. It's an M10 thread, and the 52 (in the 10X52) callout is it's length. If push comes to shove, I should be able to find a bolt that is either 60mm long which can be shortened, or, probably better, use a 10X50 bolt (or stud) that is slightly shorter. In either case, I'll stick with stainless so as not to cause too much dissimilar metals problems with the aluminum fork casting. The only problem with shorter is that I need to get the same length of engagement inside the fork as the current stud provides so as not to overstress the aluminum fork. I need to think about the torque though, as one has to be careful in tightening a bolt head vs tightening a nut (which is always preferable). 18 ft-lbs isn't very much torque, so I should be safe using the same amount. In any case, I'll apply some torque-seal paint so that I can have a visual check for any loosening in case 18 ft-lbs isn't enough,

Looks like any of us that break one of these studs will be in the same boat!
-Brad

Most stainless bolts are not as strong as just plain steel. A grade 8 steel stud or bolt would be a better choice. Poorboy
Reply
#5 04-21-2015, 02:12 PM,
I am in the same Boat! AngryThought I had read the manual correctly but somehow misread the torque. Only did one bolt though. I have about 1/2 inch of bolt sticking out so I should be able to apply gentle heat and hopefully the stud will break loose so I can replace it. Will try at a machine shop to try and find the right size stud or get them to make one. I will make a large note (in red)and attach to the manual page to ensure I do not do that again.
Jim Penner
Walkerton, Ontario
84 Interstate
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#6 04-12-2016, 05:41 AM,
I find that using the supplied Honda wrench will allow you to tighten the nut sufficiently. If they wanted higher torque they would have supplied longer wrenches, but that's my opinion.
I do have a set of torque wrenches but the only time I used them was doing the head bolts.
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

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#7 04-12-2016, 07:59 AM,
Does anyone know the thread count for the axle stud? Machine shop told me it is either 1.25 or 1.5. The specs above do not indicate that. Machine shop has M10X60 in 1.25.
Jim Penner
Walkerton, Ontario
84 Interstate
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#8 04-12-2016, 01:50 PM,
(04-12-2016, 01:50 PM)Jim Penner Wrote: Does anyone know the thread count for the axle stud? Machine shop told me it is either 1.25 or 1.5. The specs above do not indicate that. Machine shop has M10X60 in 1.25.
That part number is for 1985 only and is a stepped stud, 10MM on one end 8MM on the other.
For your 1984 you need part number 92900-08028-3B which appears to be available from Honda and even with the Canadian dollar they shouldn't be more than $2.00 each.
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#9 04-12-2016, 02:40 PM,
Thanks for the update. I will check with my local Honda dealer to see if they stock or can order that one in. Now I just need to see if I can persuade the broken stud to turn out. Machine shop thought gentle heat applied to the stud area may help. Thoughts?
Jim Penner
Walkerton, Ontario
84 Interstate
Reply
#10 04-12-2016, 02:56 PM,
(04-12-2016, 02:56 PM)Jim Penner Wrote: Machine shop thought gentle heat applied to the stud area may help. Thoughts?
As aluminum expands more than steal when heated it will help.
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#11 04-12-2016, 03:02 PM,
Final update on my broken stud experience. Gentle heat with propane torch and good pair of vice grips and the stud came out quite easily. Turns out Ideal Supply had a package of two studs 8mm by 50 with the right 1.25 thread count. Part #025-6031-2 and only cost $4. I was thrilled. Problem corrected, properly torqued and bike back together.
Jim Penner
Walkerton, Ontario
84 Interstate
Reply
#12 04-17-2016, 06:28 AM,
Good to hear you have it fixed
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

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#13 04-17-2016, 03:31 PM,
Did you ever contact the Honda dealer or is that a last resort with your local dealer?
Ken.
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#14 04-17-2016, 04:41 PM,
No I did not contact a Honda dealer. I was in inquiring at Ideal and came across the proper studs before I even had a chance to call Honda.
Jim Penner
Walkerton, Ontario
84 Interstate
Reply
#15 04-18-2016, 02:57 PM,


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