Thread Rating:
  • 5 Vote(s) - 3 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Rear wheel removal
I noticed a big tear in my back tire tonight when I got home. From the looks of it no way I should have made it home!

Now I need to get my rear wheel off to replace the tire, I would not even consider riding it anywhere with the tire in this shape. I don't have a trailer, and would rather just do it myself.

I looked at a couple video's, but if you have a link to a good one that would help.
Its a 1984 GL1200 Interstate. I read that I need to remove my left saddle bag?

Also looks like I can leave the drive inplace and just remove the wheel and tire?

I read something about "moly 60" grease, can I get that at any auto supply?

Thanks
Reply
#1 04-13-2014, 05:27 PM,
I just removed mine to put a new one on. I ended up removing the right saddle bag because the lower shock bolt head in the final drive was stripped bad. I had to remove the shock and drive unit as one to repair it. Other then that problem it was easy getting out.
Reply
#2 04-13-2014, 05:37 PM,
i take the wheel out but i have never taken off the boxs, just undo the wheel and the bottom bolt for the shocker pull the large bolt that holds the wheel, it well come up near the shocker bolt get someone to push down on the seat and it will go pastand come out job done, but it must be on the center stand .Smile
Reply
#3 04-13-2014, 09:58 PM,
I just replaced both tires on my '85 and I also took the opportunity to lube the drive gears and shaft as well as replace the left shock boot. I took off the left and right saddlebags and loosened the mufflers so they would drop down a little to clear the axle as I pulled it out. I'm glad that I decided to do the lubrication since the gears were bone dry, on an otherwise well maintained bike. I recommend taking the extra time and effort to do the extra things now and that may prevent another job that may take away more of your riding time. If you choose to do that, you can roll out the wheel with the shaft attached and then disassemble.

I bought the Honda Moly 60 through Amazon. I did watch a couple youtube videos to build up my confidence and they did.

Cheers.
Dan
Past Rides:
'57 Allstate (Puch) Moped
'68 Honda CL350
'71 Honda CB750 K1
'65 Ossa Stiletto 250
Gloria - '69 Pontiac GTO convertible
Current:
Angela - '85 Honda GL1200A
Silvia - '05 Honda GL1800
Reply
#4 04-14-2014, 01:27 AM,
Using my motor cycle jack I can get the rear wheel well up into the air.
It looks to me like I can reach the bolts I need too without removing the cases?


Is the moly 60 a grease or oil? Is there a substitute I might find local? Aside from the Honda dealer if I can avoid it...

What type lube does the rear drive need? I notice a plug on the top of the final drive unit, is that where you lube it?

I am planning to try and get the wheel off tonight after work, then get the tire replaced this week.
I will take a picture of the damage to the tire, I have never seen anything this bad, I don't know why its not flat or why I am not dead.

My wife noticed it after a ride last night, otherwise I was planning to ride it to work today!
Reply
#5 04-14-2014, 03:48 AM,
Get used to taking the bags off when doing the rear wheel, you cant carry a motorcycle lift with you all the time Smile

USE moly grease as per manual...... you will find it cheaper than trying to replace the splines.

I usually do mine once every two years if I don't have to replace the tires.
The only stupid questions are the one's that are not asked.

Reply
#6 04-14-2014, 06:31 AM,
Ya, the bags come off in minutes (unless you have extra STUFF) makes the job a whole lot easier.

Have not found the moly 60 grease in any auto parts stores around here, Honda shop should have it.

Some tires are a tight squeeze, let the air out of the tire.

The final drive takes 90 weight (or is it 80??) check the manual. The big hole is the filler, the small hole is the level check. Be sure the bike is on the center stand.
A rainy day off beats a sunny day at work any time..................
Reply
#7 04-14-2014, 10:03 AM,
Removing the bags does mean taking more off and putting more on, but it also affords more room to work.
I take the bags off as well as the rear fender so I don’t have to jack the bike up so far to get the back wheel out.
Remove the valve stem from the tire because it IS a tight squeeze and an inflated tire will not clear.
The same goes for installation, after getting the tire beads to seat properly, remove the valve stem again or you will never get that wheel installed.
Since you are back there, remove the final drive and Moly 60 the splines on the drive shaft that fits into the universal joint. Don’t remove the shaft from the final drive unless you want to replace that seal too.
Carefully move the universal joint boot so you can get some Moly 60 on the output shaft, then slide the universal joint onto the output shaft.
Be careful when you fit the boot around the lip of the swing arm. The boot may be old and you may punch a hole or tear it. You don’t want water leaking in there!
There are two o rings back there, one is on the final drive flange (item 13) and the other is buried in the final drive unit (item 14 in the parts books). Make sure they are both there or your Moly will spin right out in short order.
Use Hondas Moly 60. You don’t use that much and it is the correct stuff to use.
(I have read where BMW and Yamaha shafties are using the Honda Moly 60 instead of ‘their’ stuff. It is just what I have read folks!)
Leave the four final drive bolts loose until you get the rear wheel back on and it aligns with the final drive.
Before final torqueing of the pinch bolt and the axel nut, rotate the rear wheel and listen for anything rubbing, or you may have to take it off again.
(don’t ask)
I am on my forth rear, Shinko and do my own tires. The more you do this, the easier it gets.

Beg, borrow, or appropriate (no stealing) a manual and read, read, and re read the procedure.
As mentioned, You Tube is also a great place to learn. Repeat watching until comfortable.

Answers to questions can be found here, just post.

Good Luck!

Have Fun!

Learn Lots!

-Ride On
enjoying the view from the saddle....... due mainly to the people and information found within this site
Reply
#8 04-14-2014, 03:03 PM,
I always remove both saddle bags to allow for inspection of all components, it's a safety thing with me.

You can usually get moly 60 lube at any Honda dealer or they can order it, if not just order from here:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Genuine-OEM-Hond...1278334536
Ed (Vic) Belanger - 1954-2015
Founder of gl1200goldwings.com

Reply
#9 04-14-2014, 06:17 PM,
My brother can over and we got the back wheel off, my Harbor Freight motorcycle jack just paid for it self as far as I am concerned!

We did not remove the bags, but everything else pretty much fell inline.
I did not remove the drive unit, all looks good there, wheel bearings look good.
Brake pads where just about gone!

Looks like the tire must have broken belts, it was in VERY bad shape, big gash out of round, bad!

Ordered a time from a local shop, suppose to be in Friday. Found brake pads local, picking up tonight. Will report with pictures when I am back in the game...

Thanks for all the help!
Reply
#10 04-16-2014, 08:50 AM,
Tire is on without issue, road it Sunday, thanks for the help.

Do have another issue, will start a thread in brakes.
Reply
#11 04-21-2014, 09:06 AM,
(04-14-2014, 01:27 AM)GWdan Wrote: I just replaced both tires on my '85 and I also took the opportunity to lube the drive gears and shaft as well as replace the left shock boot. I took off the left and right saddlebags and loosened the mufflers so they would drop down a little to clear the axle as I pulled it out. I'm glad that I decided to do the lubrication since the gears were bone dry, on an otherwise well maintained bike. I recommend taking the extra time and effort to do the extra things now and that may prevent another job that may take away more of your riding time. If you choose to do that, you can roll out the wheel with the shaft attached and then disassemble.

I bought the Honda Moly 60 through Amazon. I did watch a couple youtube videos to build up my confidence and they did.

Cheers.

I was interested to read that you loosened and lowered your mufflers as I thought that might make the job quite a bit easier. Is there any special considerations to lowering the mufflers? Do you have to to repace any gaskets, are ther rusted bolts that twist off, ect.?
I just did my bike wheel for tire replacement and was once again aghast at the amount of time it took, for what should otherwise be a fairly simple proceedure for a motorcycle.
Reply
#12 06-03-2018, 11:48 AM,


Possibly Related Threads…
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  wheel bearings Front and rear Dave-85-LTD 1 65 06-14-2018, 01:26 PM
Last Post: glhonda
  rear wheel removal 1200 Aspencade Milesofsmiles 2 71 06-03-2018, 09:01 AM
Last Post: SIR tricky
  rear wheel swap seminolejoe 25 2,511 09-12-2016, 08:15 AM
Last Post: T. Bix
  Front Wheel Removal Milesofsmiles 4 895 03-08-2015, 07:45 AM
Last Post: bs175dths
  Rear wheel looks off center after tire change Flounder 4 748 12-13-2013, 11:01 PM
Last Post: Flounder
  Rear tire removal, easier third or fourth time around Roleketu 13 1,433 08-15-2013, 06:54 AM
Last Post: bs175dths
  Rear Tire Removal Cyberchip 11 1,341 05-24-2012, 10:35 AM
Last Post: bs175dths
  Rear wheel wear Hillbilly Rider 5 522 05-03-2012, 08:55 PM
Last Post: ghostrider52005
  Any tips on rear tire removal? PanMan75 8 518 04-01-2012, 07:34 AM
Last Post: PanMan75
  Swaping the rear wheel/final drive? gronk99 8 824 04-29-2010, 10:32 AM
Last Post: gronk99

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)

Contact Us | GL1200 GOLDWINGS | Return to Top | | Lite (Archive) Mode | RSS Syndication
google-site-verification: googled4b4fe31e07b65d8.html